Category Archives: FADED SIGNPOSTS

More … Old Signposts

Old Signpost

Recently a friend directed me to these comments made by the British preacher, Charles Spurgeon.

 “You say, ‘If I had a little more, I should be very satisfied.’ You make a mistake. If you are not content with what you have, you would not be satisfied if it were doubled.”

“It is not how much we have, but how much we enjoy, that makes happiness.”

“God is too good to be unkind and He is too wise to be mistaken. And when we cannot trace His hand, we must trust His heart.”

“Nobody ever outgrows Scripture; the book widens and deepens with our years.”

“The way to do a great deal is to keep on doing a little. The way to do nothing at all is to be continually resolving that you will do everything.”

“No faith is so precious as that which lives and triumphs through adversity. Tested faith brings experience. You would never have believed your own weakness had you not needed to pass through trials. And you would never have known God’s strength had His strength not been needed to carry you through.”

“Anxiety does not empty tomorrow of its sorrow, but only empties today of its strength.”

“Learn to say no. It will be of more use to you than to be able to read Latin.”

“Sickness may befall, but the Lord will give grace; poverty may happen to us, but grace will surely be afforded; death must come but grace will light a candle at the darkest hour. Reader, how blessed it is as years roll round, and the leaves begin again to fall, to enjoy such an unfading promise as this, ‘The Lord will give grace.’”

Martha Hawn VanCise©2015 www.signpostsonhightrails.com

 

A Pilgrim’s Problem – a faded signpost

Faded Signpost

The pilgrim worried that sometimes he would not have much time to care for his love-relationship with God. Then the Lord spoke to him and answered his unspoken question:

Do you have only one minute? Hem it with quietness. Do not spend it in thinking how little time you have. I can give you much in one minute.” Diuma (a 7th century missionary)

 The pilgrim sat by the water and his dear Lord said to him:
“As the ripples of the river glance up to the light,
let your heart glance up to Me in little looks of love
very often through the day.”
 Amy Carmichael (19-20th century missionary to India)

Taking time – even minutes here and there – to maintain a love-relationship with God has always been a problem for pilgrims but will always be essential for  progress.

 Art by Mike Wimmer © used with permission http://www.mikewimmer.com/

Martha Hawn VanCise©2014 www.signpostsonhightrails.com

 

 

 

Helping God

Old Signpost, Helping God

I could never understand why God struck a man dead for trying to keep the sacred ark from falling off an ox cart (II Samuel 6: 1-7). In Streams in the Desert however, I found the following Old Signpost posted by A.B. Simpson.

A life was lost in Israel because a pair of human hands was laid unbidden upon the ark of God. They were placed upon it with the best intent, to steady it when trembling and shaking as the oxen drew it along the rough way; but they touched God’s work presumptuously, and they fell paralyzed and lifeless.

Much of the life of faith consists in letting things alone.

If we wholly trust an interest to God, we must keep our hands off it; and He will guard it for us better than we can help Him. “Be still before the LORD and wait patiently for him; do not fret when people succeed in their ways, when they carry out their wicked schemes (Psalm 37:7).

Things may seem to be going all wrong, but He knows as well as we; and He will arise in the right moment if we are really trusting Him so fully as to let Him work in His own way and time.

There is nothing so masterly as inactivity in some things, and there is nothing so hurtful as restless working, for God has undertaken to work His sovereign will.  A.B. Simpson (1843-1919)

It is such a comfort to drop the tangles of life
into God’s hands and leave them there.

—Streams in the Desert, July 6
KJV Scripture changed to NIV.

Martha Hawn VanCise ©2014 www.signpostsonhightrails.com